Knolling, Flat Lay, Assemblage Art

flat lay, leaves, autumn, fall, flowers

As you can see I’m learning even more new terms.

The honeysuckle in my garden is having a second flush of blooms and the scent is heavenly in these sunny Autumn days. It inspired this Flat Lay piece of Assemblage art which includes a few verbascum blooms and birch leaves.

And did you know about Knolling ……… no? Nor me ….until I was enlightened by Instagram

knolling is “the process of arranging like objects in parallel or 90 degree angles as a method of organization”.

knolling, leaves, nature, flatlay, autumn, fall

I’m so fascinated by the markings on these leavesflatlay, leaves, Fall, Autumn

Leaf love!

leaf love

Yellow and grey are In!

little forest

(Mini birch forest)

Yesterday’s spiral of leaves were drying out but still looking gorgeous enough to adorn with some Marigold petals and Honeysuckle

spiral, autumn, leaves and petals

Oh! Ah! Oooo! the morning dew on Marigolds!!!!!!  I’m just loving this Autumn.

morning dew on marigold

I’m not a fan of yellow flowers in the garden as a rule, but couldn’t you just dive into this buxom bloom.

Why not add some honeysuckle berriesspiral of leaves and petals

I did 3 hours of digging in my garden yesterday in the Battle Against Bamboo (and bindweed!) So I could enjoy some guilt free playtime with petals and leaves.

autumn spiral

A Flat Lay extravaganza!

Not In a Vase, but all from my garden, I am once again joining in the IAVOM Garden Party this week.

and

Cee’s FOTD.

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Silent Sunday: Autumn

spiral of leaves

colour sketch on my Nikon camera

liquid amber, maple, sycamore

autumn sunset

 

Rosslyn and Crochet Butterflies

Rosslyn variations.

the same but different, crochet blankets

I am making a Lap Blanket each for my twin granddaughters who have a birthday coming up.

It has been fun making them the same but different, and playing around with Helen Shrimpton’s excellent Rosslyn Pattern.

In order to make them rectangular instead of square I added a few rows and some butterflies at each end, before adding the edging.

Twig’s Lap Blanket

crochet butterflies

The first pattern for a butterfly border I found was this one by Debi Dearest

I left the antennae long until just before I was going to finish them off by snipping them and melting the ends next to the flame of a candle to seal them.

crochet butterfly border

Debi’s method of making the bodies so that they do not move around can be found here

Then I found another pattern for Twiglet’s butterflies

Twiglet’s Lap blanket

crochet butterflies

crochet butterfly stitch

 

Crochet Butterfly Stitch

 

To make the body and antennae I found that wrapping the yarn round twice on each side and then knotting the two ends together after the intial reef knot gave a slightly better finish, giving the butterfly a head and keeping the antennae in line rather than going off at odd angles.

crochet butterflies

The yellow one above is made as in the video and the pink body is made with my variation.

Next I seal the ends of the antennae by holding them near to a candle flame to melt them together so they don’t fray.

Washing and blocking these two blankets with all those butterflies and picots round the edge – as well as the roses took a whole day.Rosslyn by Helen Shrimpton

I still have some roses to sew on to Twiglet’s blanket before the blankets are ready for packing and posting.

In a Flat Lay on Monday

flat lay, autumn, Fall, leaves, flowers

I’m learning all sorts of new terms through Instagram hashtags. I had no idea that arranging things like this had a name – it is called ‘Flat Lay’ apparently. I have done this ever since I was a kid – I just love arranging things, now I have a proper grown-up name for it.

Joining in with Cathy for In a Vase on Monday.

Image

Silent Sunday: St.Catherine’s Chapel

St. Catherine's Chapel, Abbotsbury

In a Vase on Monday

pink flowers, pelargoniums

I have picked all the flowers off my pelargoniums and lifted the plants.

In the past I have tried to dry them out and then repot in the Spring and planting out after frosts have finished – this had very limited success.

For the past couple of years I have dug them up and kept them going inside all winter, then planted them out again – each time removing the blooms and taking cuttings.

It seems to work and I get the bonus of flowers all winter.

I feed them with a little Tomato feed each week.

What do you do with yours?

Joining in with Cathy at Rambling in the Garden

and

Cee’s Flower of the Day

Silent Sunday at Tate Modern

Tate Modern, Bridget Riley

DSC_0895

Bridget Riley

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