Category Archives: how to

In a Vase on Monday

Self-seeded Calendula and aster with ripe and ripening pears.

It is a challenge to catch the pears at the the right time to pick them before the wasps get to them. A good crop this year.

Joining Cathy and her joyful meme: In a Vase on Monday

I am completely replanting the bed behind the espalier pear trees. Everything has been taken out because the ground elder and marestail had taken over.

Looking from North to South

I dug it over, took everything out, and dug it over once a week for 4 weeks in the hope of getting every bit of weed root out. I saved all the bulbs and have replanted them in a completely random fashion and planted new and old irises

Looking from South to North

A rogue sunflower which grew in the pot I had the tiny fuschia (Jollies Nantes)  in.

I have also scattered seed from Nigella, calendula, cerinthe, aquilegia, foxglove and purple loosestrife.

It will be fun to see how this looks in Spring.

The daughter of a friend of mine is just starting her garden and liked my scattergun way of creating a border, so I have collected seed for her to try it out.

I found this You Tube clip

 

made some little seed packets out of a Gudren Sjoden catalogue

I loved making these, I like the way they are in the shape of little flower pots.

Joining in with Cee’s Flower of the Day

 

Rainbow for Big Bro

The last of the 8 blankets I have crocheted for my Grandchildren. It is quite a relief to know they all have one now.

I am following in the footsteps of my paternal Grandmother who crocheted a blanket for each of her 14 grandchildren, luckily, I only have 8.

The brief: Big Bro wanted ripples like his brother’s blanket, but different.

He wanted bright rainbow colours and lots of blues. I made a sample in all Stylecraft Special DK yarn, but the purple, orange and some of the blues were not quite right, so we scoured the internet to find the colours he liked.

I always really enjoy the design process with my Grandchildren. They have very clear ideas about what they want and I like to encourage them. I believe it is important to give children opportunities to make creative decisions – a life skill worth having which encourages them to develop their own style.

The pattern is Attic24’s Neat Ripple Blanket using Acrylic DK and 4.5mm hook

I did a starting Chain of 213

It measures 1m 34cm x 1m 94cm

Each row of colour (2 rows of crochet) takes about 15 gms of SSDK yarn.

crochet rainbow blanket, throw
The mix of repeating colour orders and random mixes makes the blanket more interesting – well I think so. Do you agree? Or would you prefer a strict repeating pattern?

Colour Order:

You can find the colour order for the first 30 rows in this post.
Rows 31 onwards
Geraardsbergen (2011).  Scheepjes Colour Crafter

Saxe           Cygnet DK

Petrol   James C Brett Top Value Shade 846

Hayfield Bonus Extra Value Shade 0824

Turquoise SSDK (Stylecraft Special Double Knit)

Empire SSDK

Petrol SSDK

Green SSDK

Grass Green SSDK

Sunshine SSDK

Bright Orange – James C Brett

Matador SSDK

Fuchsia Purple SSDK

Orchid – King Cole Pricewise DK

Purple – King Cole Pricewise DK

Lobelia – SSDK

Royal – SSDK

Lapis – SSDK

Aster – SSDK

Turquoise – SSDK

Azure –  Hayfield Bonus DK, Extra Value (0824)

Petrol – James C Brett

Empire – SSDK

Petrol – SSDK

Bottle – SSDK

Green – SSDK

Grass – SSDK

Sunshine SSDK

Bright Orange – James C Brett

Matador  – SSDK

Raspberry – SSDK

Fuchsia Purple – SSDK

Orchid – King Cole Pricewise DK

Purple – King Cole Pricewise DK

Royal SSDK

Geraardsbergen (2011).  Scheepjes Colour Crafter

Aster – SSDK

Lapis – SSDK

Empire – SSDK

Azure –  Hayfield Bonus DK, Extra Value (0824)

Turquoise – SSDK

Petrol   James C Brett Top Value Shade 846

Petrol – SSDK

Bottle – SSDK

Green – SSDK

Grass – SSDK

Sunshine SSDK

Bright Orange – James C Brett

Matador  – SSDK

Fuchsia Purple – SSDK

Orchid – King Cole Pricewise DK

Purple – King Cole Pricewise DK

Lobelia – SSDK

Royal – SSDK

Saxe           Cygnet DK

Geraardsbergen (2011).  Scheepjes Colour Crafter

Aster – SSDK

Turquoise – SSDK

Azure –  Hayfield Bonus DK, Extra Value (0824)

Petrol – James C. Brett

Empire – SSDK

Petrol – SSDK

 

THE BORDER

rainbow blanket

The first row in Petrol – James C. Brett,  filled in the troughs of the waves, following the instructions onAttic24’s website.

The second row of single crochet (US) is in the same yarn.

Third row in Azure –  Hayfield Bonus DK, Extra Value (0824) is double crochet (US)

Fourth and last row is in Turquoise SSDK in Crab Stitch.

~~~

Ta Dah!!!

rainbow blanket for a 10 year old

~~~~

For other crocheted blankets go to my THROWS page

 

Textile Tuesday: Kunin Felt

Kunin Felt, the Stitchbook CollectiveThe Stitchbook Collective, organised by Helen Birmingham of Untangled Threads couldn’t have happened at a better time. Each month a box of delights pops through my letterbox and new little textile project is born, full of learning, peaceful stitching and an opportuity to share it with the others in the Collective.

If you are looking for a small slow stitching project, I can highly recommend Helen’s kits, which come with full tutorials and all the materials needed to produce a piece of textile art.

May’s box of goodies was all about Kunin Felt and playing around with candles and heating the felt to form flowers or other shapes that took your fancy.

I was a bit stumped to start with and could not work out a design I wanted to create, so I turned to Pinterest and found this post which inspired my design.pinterest, felt, B Zwickler

I laid out some pieces of shiny cord included in the kit an added my own Sari waste cord which I got from YarnYarn, and couched them onto the black backing felt.Yarn Yarn, felt

and gradually built up the design.

felt design

A fun month with bright colours and playing with fire, fabulous!

Have you been playing with textiles this month, or maybe you have some archive posts about textiles you would like to share. Just pop a link in the comments, I would love to see them.

Textile Tuesday happens on the first Tuesday of each month.

Ear Savers

Ear savers for NHS workers, for use with surgical masksCrocheted Ear Savers

A band to be worn with Surgical Masks to stop ears getting sore.

5” x 2″ or 12cm x 5.5cm

EDIT: I have seen photos of them in use, and the nurse who I made them for says they are just the right length for her. 

US terms

Abbreviations

Ch        chain               dc        double crochet

St         stitch

Materialsear saving bands to be worn with surgical masks

Yarn:

These can be made in any yarn that can be washed at 60 degrees in a washing machine.

Stylecraft Special DK says 40 degrees on the label, but I made a blanket for my Mum out of SSDK, she is in a Care Home. The blanket has been washed many times at 60 degrees, and although the yarn has become thinner and less fluffy,  it is holding up well 4 years later.

I used oddments of Stylecraft Special DK: Matador, Turquoise, Fiesta and Sunshine.

Approximately 4gms for each band.oddments

Hook : 4.5mm

2 buttons, 1″ diameter

Pattern

Ch14 for the foundation chain.

Round 1

Dc in the third ch from the hookphoto tutorial

work 10 more dcs into the sts of the foundation chain.

Work 7 dcs into the last st to form the rounded endphoto tutorial, crochet, ear savers

10 dcs into the loops at the base of the foundation chain.

bands to be worn with surgical masks

Work 2 dcs into the last loop

Picking up two loops at the end, work 3 dcs into these loops.

tutorial

Join with a slip st. into the stitch indicated by the needle

slip st to join

Round 2

Ch2, work dc into the same st.

ear bands tutorial

10 dcs

2 dcs into each of the next 7sts

10 dcs

photo tutorial, ear band

2dcs into the next 6 sts. Join with a slip st.

Alternatively add another colour

tutorial for ear savers

Round 3

Ch 1, crab st around. After the last st, cut the thread, pull through and sew in to join.

crab stitch edge

crab stitch edge, photo tutorial

Sew in the ends and sew buttons on.

ear savers for use with surgical mask, crochet pattern

A great little project for using up some of my stash.

I have made these for the daughter of a friend of mine who is a nurse in our local hospital.  When I asked her what colour she would like she said ‘oh anything bright’.

I hope these hit the spot!

 

Scrap Happy Box

machine embroidery on crazy patchwork

I made this piece of crazy patchwork in 2013 and although I have photographed it and have tote bags and cushions made from the ensuing fabric, I have never made anything with the fabric itself.

Another little fabric box seemed just the right project for it.

Still using canvas left over from my needlepoint days, I cut the sides 3″ by 2.5″ and the base a 3″ squarebox structure

making a fabric box

I lined the box with an old T-shirt, the hem at the top.

recycling an old T-shirt

Here are all the layers, ready to be stitched together.

pieces ready for assemblong, fabric box

The base is T-shirt fabric on both sides.

After stitching the layers together with some runnig stitches across the pieces, I blanket stitched the edges

fabric box

Then sewed the pieces all together to form the box

IMG_8239

Using some 2ply crochet cotton left over from a dreamcatcher, and a 2.5mm hook, I did a chain stitch all round the top into the blanket stitches, to make a simple shell stitch edging.

fabric box with crochet edging

Lots of Scrap Happiness to join in with Kate and her merry band of Scrappers on Scrap Happy Day, which is on the 15th of every month.

If you want to see how some scraps of rusty barbed wire can be used to create art, have a look at my previous post.

Pop across to see what others have been doing with their scraps:

Gun, TittiHeléneEvaSue, Nanette, Lynn, Lynda,
Birthe, Turid, Susan, Cathy, Debbierose, Tracy, Jill, Claire, Jan,
Moira, LindaChrisNancy, Alys, Kerry, Claire, Jean,
Joanne, Jon, HayleyDawn, Gwen, Connie, Bekki, Pauline, Sue L,
Sunny and Kjerstin

Always inspiring!

Textile Tuesday: Box

Textile Tuesday happens on the first Tuesday of each month. Join in by leaving a link in the Comments. Current or archive posts are all welcome, your own textiles or those you have seen out and about.

textile art, box

Inspired by Cathy’s Scrap Happy post, I was itching to have a go at making a fabric box.

I have lots of bits and pieces of canvas left over from my needlepoint obsession days. A piece of this made a nice firm frame.

needlepoint canvas

I cut 3″ squares of canvas, and 3½” calico squares as the backing for some little pieces of textile collage.

collage, upcycling, recycling

After stitching the pieces in place with just a few stitches, I put a piece of wadding between the calico and the canvas and stitched them all together.IMG_8217

The two pieces on the left have little pockets.

textile collages, slow stitching

I sewed blanket stitch round the edges and made a plain calico basetextile box

then oversewed the sides to the base before sewing up the sides.

Oh I did enjoy making this but it had taken me a whole day and I wanted to finish quickly. I cut a piece of canvas for the lid and thought, ‘that’ll do’.

textile box, collage, canvas lid

I added a piece of thicker wadding top and bottom and found a shell for the handle.

Ta Dah!textile box

I think it works

Now – what to put in it ….

 

Scrap Happy Stitchbook

This month’s Goody Pack from The Stitchbook Collective, is all about dyeing and staining.

beach finds

It probably comes as no surprise that I have a Rust Collection. These are all pieces I have gathered over the last 5 or 6 years whilst beachcombing.

I have been waiting to use them for dyeing fabric, but every time I looked online for instructions, I came across confusing information, so didn’t have a go …. until now!

Helen Birmingham’s written instructions are clear and run alongside a helpful video tutorial. This gave me the perfect kickstart. You can still buy the kit in her online shop.

I relished getting each rusty piece out and arranging them.

flat lay

enjoying the texture and colours.rusty nails

Then the happy task of wrapping them in white-vinegar-soaked fabric.

fabric dyeing with rust

Leaving them overnight was a challenge – I’m SO impatient

Some were stacked on a trivet above my cooling wood-burning stove to speed up the process

rust dyeing stack

I also stained a few bits of paper for collage at the same time.

oven rust

The larger pieces were put on top of vinegar-soaked fabric and put it in the oven.dyeing with rust

I put the oven on the lowest temperature for just five minutes and left for a while, repeating this several times, sprinkling with white vinegar to keep it moist.

rust stain

The grid effect came from a disposable barbeque mesh, that had been left on the beach.

rust dyeing

Fun!nails in calico and curtain lining

Nails wrapped in strips of an old calico curtain and the lining were my favourite little experiments

IMG_6857

My intention was to dye strips of fabric and embroidery thread to use in textile artIMG_6874

– but I loved the look of the wrapped nails so much I have kept some of them wrapped

wrapped and rusted

and will use them as they are.

To preserve them, I have painted them with some old acrylic varnish found in the garage, left by the previous owner – it must be at least 15 years old, but it did the trick.

varnish

So exciting.

This is a little stitched sampler that will go in my Stitchbook.

textile art for The Stitchbook Collective

I am enjoying this so much!

Joining Kate for her monthly Scrap Happy get together.

There are lots more Happy Scrappers to check out as well.

Gun, TittiHeléneEvaSue, Nanette, Lynn, Lynda,
Birthe, Turid, Susan, Cathy, Debbierose, Tracy, Jill, Claire, Jan,
MoiraLindaChrisNancy, Alys, Kerry, Claire, Jean,
Joanne, Jon, HayleyDawn, Gwen, Connie, Bekki, Pauline and Sue L.

Have you been creative with things destined for the scrap heap? If so, leave a link in the comments of Kate’s post and join in the fun.

Free Seahorse Pattern

I have been trying to make the pattern for this little Seahorse easier to understand. This little chap has led me a merry dance! Here goes.

There is a simpler printable pattern – with just one photo of the finished seahorse, for sale in my Etsy and Ravelry shops.

The pattern is written in US terms. I am left-handed, if you are right-handed the seahorse will face the other way.

Use a 3mm up to a 4.5mm hook and any double knitting yarn.

I have used Stylecraft Special DK

or the pattern can be made in cotton with the appropriate sized hook.

(Use the bigger hook if you like the motif a little bigger and looser)

Abbreviations

ch      chain               sc      single crochet                dc     double crochet

hd     half double     sl      slip stitch                        tog     together

 

BODY

Ch 35

Dc into 4th ch from the hook, 1dc, 3 dc2togdouble crochet two together

2 dc, 2 tr, work 2 tr into each of the next 3 chs.

1tr, 2dc, 2 dc into each of the next 2sts, 2 hd, 3sc2tog,

single crochet 2 together

2 sl (leaving the remaining chs unworked)crochet tutorial 1

1ch

TURN

Miss one st, sl 8, 2sc, 1hd, 2hd in next st, 1dc, 2dc in next st,

2dc, 2dc into next st, 1dc, 2hd,

3sc, 2sl, miss 1st, 2sl, (to the neck)

Ch1

TURNseahorse tutorial

Miss 1, 6sl, 4sc, 2hd in next st 4 times, 2hd, 2sc, 3sl

Ch1

TURN

Miss 1, 3sl, 16sc, sc2tog, 3sl (you are now at the lower point of the neck)

HEAD

ch 8, sl into 5th ch from the hook to form a loop, (the loop will form the eye)seahorse tutorial3 sl into the chains (working back towards the neck).

TURN

6dc into loop,

TURN

miss 1st, 2 sl,

SNOUT

ch5, sl into 2nd ch from hook (forming a picot that will be the top tip at the end of the snout), dc, sc, dc.crochet seahorse tutorial

Flip the snout over, so that the picot is facing upwards.

tutorial for crochet seahorse motif

Sl into the top of the last of the dcs into the loop to attach the snout to the head.

tutorial

2dc into loop, 2hd into loop, ch3, sl into the top of the hd

1hd and 2dc into loop

sl into the first ch of the HEAD (at the neck).

crochet motif tutorial

2sl to the top of the neck,

TURN

1dc into each of 3 sts, on the top of the headcrochet

ch2,

TURN

sl into the top of dc directly below the chs

sl, ch3, sl into 3rd st from the hook, sl into dc directly below the picot just made,

(sc,* ch4, sl into 4th ch from hook, sl) twice, sl

The picture below is at this first sc*, which is made into the loop at the base of the foundation chain.

crochet motif tutorial

crochet motif seahorse

ch3, sl into 3rd ch from hook, 2sl

(ch4 miss a st, sl) 3 times, sl

FIN

ch4, 2 tr into next st. twice, ch1,

TURN

(sl, ch3) 5 times.

Fasten off.seahorse fin

Sew in the end.

When sewing in the end of the tail pull slightly to get the tail to curl.crochet seahorse motif

This new improved pattern with many more photos is untested. If you have a go, I would love to know how you get on.

It would also be fun to see how you use the motifs.

I put them on a Hoodie.

Rainbow Junkie made a wonderful wall hanging for her bathroom.

Happy Hooking!

Stitchbook Collective: Texture

The Stitchbook Collective is off and running! Our first pack arrived a day early – wow! I was jumping up and down with excitement. Little packages of delight.

The Stitchbook Collective, texture pack

A present I have given myself, each month for a whole year – it feels so good.

Then the joy of opening them all up and seeing what is inside …. all there waiting to be played with….

Helen Birmingham's Tecture pack

The Texture and Starter Packs are available to buy individually, with unlimited access to the video tutorials.

As a child, I used to go and stay with my step-grandmother, I called her Dabbity, and she would have little embroidery projects ready for me to make – it reminds me of that – Helen and Dabbity have merged together in my mind, it is warmly comforting to have those memories revived.

Once again (like in the Starter Pack) there are 9 tiny samples to create – this is the first one I did

calico squares, texture sample

It inspired me to think about making a larger one, with just the large cross-stitches to hold the fabric pieces to the back ground – so I’m off to get some more calico.

The next was a loopy one – I love these loops

calico loops, embroidery sample, Stitchbook Collective

and then a spider’s web inspired piece, weaving the textured thread through the spokes

surface embroidery, woven web

I am having fun with these.

One of the best things about this ongoing project is the Facebook Group that nearly all of the 150 in the Stitchbook Collective are members off. We share pictures of our work and aspects of the processes we go through. It amazes me to see the rich variety created from much the same materials and what gems are created on tiny areas of calico.

Do you have any embroidery on the go at the moment?

Leave a link in the comments, I’d love to see what you are up to.

Calla

Another beautiful pattern by Zoya Matyushenko available on Ravelry

crochet mandala, pattern by Zoya Matyushenko

I wanted it to look a little more open so I made this small variation:

Part of Row

28:

FPDC in FPDC, BPDC in BPDC, – (ch3, skip one BPDC, BPDC in next BPDC) 4 times

29:

FPDC in FPDC, BPDC in BPDC, (ch1, sc in ch3space, ch1, BPDC) 4 times

30:

FPDC in FPDC, (3FPDC around the BPDC, sc in ch1 space, FPDC around sc, sc in Ch1 space) 4 times

~

This one is sewn onto a 50cm coated metal hoop from Glitterwitch.

First I attach the mandala to the hoop with stitch markers at each picot point, then I sew each point onto the ring going over the ring 3 times. I thread the yarn through the edge of the work along the back, to the next point.

Made with Scheepjes Sweet Treat 2ply cotton in Snow White and a 2.5mm hook

That is Crochet Mandala/Dreamcatcher number 10 made, 3 as presents for my grandchildren, 7 for me. The obsession continues!

 

Stitchbook Collective

Last year I joined with  Cathy in entering a Heart in the Sawdust Heart collective exhibition. Helen Birmingham, of Untangled Threads, who organised that amazingly moving event, is now hosting another collective venture and I am delighted to be taking part.

The Stitchbook Collective of 150 people are each making a 12 page textile book that will culminate in an exhibition in November next year.

There is a Starter Pack.

Everything arrives beautifully packaged and presentedstitchbook collective

Presents arriving in the post!

Helen has made some very easy-to-follow videos which are suitable for complete beginners and experienced embroiderers alike. Anyone can buy the kits and make a textile book following her excellent tutorials – I can highly recommend them.

The whole experience is a complete and utter treat!

The Starter Pack includes instructions for some stitching samplers and a collage pack.IMG_4651

The first task is to divide a piece of calico into 9 and work the suggested stitches with different thicknesses of stranded cotton. Helen’s videos give very clear instructions, but she is also happy for us to make our samples unique to us – the main emphasis is on relaxation and enjoyment.

Whilst stitching I kept thinking of my travel doodles and how they might look in stitch

travel sketchbook doodles

It has got me wondering how I might combine the two together

Included in the Starter Pack are materials to make a collage to be sewn on one of the pages.collage kit

fabric collage

Helen even provides a drawstring bag in which to keep the work.

starter pack materials

Although the 150 places in the Collective have been filled, the packs are available to all, with access to the teaching videos. I can highly recommend them.

 

 

I’m really looking forward to the September Pack pinging its way through my letterbox.

Painting a Cow

Miss E and I were watching a TV programme called ‘Home is where the Art is‘, which had 3 artists pitching to a potential buyer for a commissioned work of art. I asked her, “If you were to commission a piece of art, what would it be?” To my surprise she said, “a painitng of a cow”. Not what I was expecting from an 11 year old.

She had a birthday coming up so ………. off I went trawling the web to see if I could find some inspiration. Hey presto! Kath Dunne on Instagram was the answer. Her work is full of life and colour.

I saved this image to my computer

Kath Dunne

Isn’t it fabulous!!! Do go and have a look at Kath’s other work. She is an Australian artist and you can see her work on her website: kathdunneartworks.com

I wondered if I could paint a similar picture for Miss E’s birthday present.

I tried it out in an altered book to see if I thought I could capture something acceptable

altered book

Hmm, yes, I thought I could, so I started to paint with acrylics on canvas, sketching out the basic shape with thin white paint that I could rub off with a damp cloth til I got the shapes I wanted.first sketch for cow painting

With hindsight, it would have been better to block in the background of the shape of the cow first, in light and dark tones, before adding splashes of colour.

sketch

At this point I knew it was time to put the eye in – yikes – scary – the eye and the expression in the eye can make or break a painting. I needed to have a practice painting to work on alongside this one

practice painting

Gosh I did find it all a bit stressful!

Back to collage and sploshing paint around in an abstract way for a bit of relaxation, for a while – then onwards ……

cows

And here it is, below, the finished painting – I wish I could have captured the look on Miss E’s face when I gave it to her – she was absolutely surprised and thrilled. She said it looks like Clover, her current show calf – so that is the name of the painting: Clover.

cow painting

I contacted Kath Dunne to ask her permission to share my painting with a link to her website and she said ‘go for it’! Creativity and connection across continents – love it!

I’m looking into making a few prints of Clover, let me know if you are interested.

Scrap Happy

Joining Kate at Talesfromchiconia for her Scrap Happy gathering on the 15th of every month.

A friend’s birthday was approaching and I knew she would appreciate the recyle/reuse ethos behind this meme, so I went to my vast collection of bits of crochet I have made as experiments with either pattern or colour. crochet experiments

I have a similar collection of art experiments with acrylic paint on paper, so I chose one of these for the basis of the card

Folding the card into 3, I tried out a couple of ideas

DSC_0484

I decided to use the flower which is the centre of the Amanzi block, I lined up all the ends and marked the positions of the holes I wanted to make in the card

DSC_0486

sitting it atop a ball of yarn to pierce the needle through

DSC_0485

Then I sewed the threads through and tied them at the back

Ta dah!bday card

The present was some handmade soap I had bought in St Davids, Pembrokeshire, from the force of nature that is Julia Horton-Mansfield who owns the Really Wild Soap Company.DSC_0491

I first met Julia on one of her guided wild food foraging walks

The soaps and card were wrapped up in a page from an old magazine

present

Pop along over to Kate’s to find others who can inspire you to usefully use up bits and pieces of this and that.

Happy Scrapping

Yennefer completed

yenneferYou can see the beginning of this mandala journey in this post. It took a while but at last I found a 70 cm metal hoop to attach the mandala to.bits

Using Scheepjes Whirl, Turquoise Turntable, and a 3.5mm hook, I cut the thread after Round 19, 24, 30 and 32 to wind off until the next colour join or two. I think I have used just over half the Whirl on this mandala and I will make another with the yarn that remains.

I didn’t block this one, I attached each point to the hoop with a stitch marker

IMG_4243

and then using a needle and a length of the yarn, I sewed each picot point to the hoop, threading the yarn through the edge to get to the next pointIMG_4245

It will hang on the wall above my fireplace, but I’m wondering if I should mount it on something first.

Beach Bunting: adding beads and shells

Inspired by Attic24’s Dune Blanket.

knitted bunting

I used:

Beading Needle

Silamide waxed nylon beadstring

Seed beads: here is a link to some similar to the ones I used.

Swarovski crystals:  I used 3mm bicone clear AB crystals, although I’m not sure where you can get them from nowadays

Semi-precious gem stones

shells and beads

and some shells with holes in them – gathered from the beach.

Put a knot in the end of the beadstring and attach to the bottom of the triangle at the back, sew a knot by taking the needle through a loop and exit at the very tip.

Add a crystal, a bead or semi-precious stone, a crystal and a seed bead, then take the thread through the hole in the shell

attaching shells to bunting

and back up through the beads and crystals and into the point of the bunting triangle.

Fasten off at the back

And there you have it! Some seaside bunting

seaside baby bunting

Inspired by Attic24’s Dune Blanket

Dune Blanket Bunting

Find the pattern for the Triangles here.

and

The photo tutorial for making the triangles into bunting here.

Let me know if you have a go at making some Beachy Bunting, I’d love to know how you get on.

Beach Baby Bunting

This post follows on from the previous post: Knitted Bunting where you will find the free pattern for the triangles.inspired by Attic24 Dune blanket

It is inspired by the Attic24 Dune Blanket colours. Wouldn’t this bunting go SO well with a baby blanket in the Dune design. AND how about making a little jacket (see my free Baby Jacket pattern here)  in Dune colours too – ooooo – mouthwateringly delicious!

I have used Stylecraft Special DK: Spearmint, Cloud Blue, Pale Rose, Parma Violet, Powder Pink, Duck Egg and Spearmint.

Joining the triangles and making them into Bunting

Line up all the triangles on a 4mm needle in the order you want them to be, with Right Sides facing.

DO NOT CUT THE YARN OF THE LAST TRIANGLEbunting

Working on the last triangle: Cast off purlwise.knitted bunting

until the last stitch

last st

* Turn your work so that you have the Wrong Side facing you.

Knit one stitch

knit

Put the stitch just knitted onto the left hand needle IMG_3962and knit one. IMG_3963Repeat 8 more times to create a joining chain of 10 stitches altogether.

(Add more chains if you want your triangles further apart)IMG_3964Turn your work so that you have the RS facing.

Bring the yarn to the front and cast off the next triangle purlwise

IMG_3967Repeat from * across all the triangles.

 

When you have cast off across the top of the last triangle make a chain as long as you want it to be, for hanging up your bunting.

I have done a chain of 30 stitches.

Join yarn to the first triangle and make a matching chain.IMG_3969

Sew in all the ends.

Here is the pre-blocked bunting

knitted bunting

coastal pastels

Now to block and add some beads and/or shells.shells and beads

I have had these beads for years.  The supplier I bought them from no longer exists but I found these semi-precious gemstone chips online which are similar.

The shells have been collected over time, from lots of different far flung beaches.

The pattern is untested – please let me know how you get on.

Here is a post about attaching the beads and shells.

Lost Garden: Vintage look.

crochet throw, pattern by Helen Shrimpton

The Lost Garden throw is finished. This is a wedding present for the daughter of one of my closest friends, following the colour scheme the engaged couple have in their sitting room. This is not a palette I would have chosen myself, but it has been oh so soothing to work with.

Some people on Helen’s Hookaholics Facebook group have said it reminds them of snowdrops, Meissen china, Victorian design and Poldark so I thought ‘vintage’ probably brings all those descriptions together.

The pattern is by Helen Shrimpton and it is a delight to work – very relaxing, nothing too demanding or complicated.

Made with Stylecraft Special DK in Parchment, Lincoln, Cream, Stone and Toy and a 4.5mm hook.

It measures 1m 43cm square.

I have listed the colour order, up to the border in two previous posts:

Victorian Snowdrop Garden

and

Lost Garden Corners

and now for the border order!

Vintage Lost Garden Border

Round 67: Toy

Round 68: Stone

Round 69 and 70: Toy

Round 71: Lincoln

Round 72 and 73: Toy

Round 74: Stone

Round 75: Toy

Round 76, 77, 78, 79: Parchment

Round 80: Lincoln

Round 81, 82: Stone

Round 83 – 89: Parchment

Round 90: Lincoln

Round 91, 92: Cream

Round 93, 94: Parchment

~~~~~~

I’m sure to make this pattern again one day and I’m wondering what it would look like in a graded yarn like one of the new Scheepes Whirl Cakes, Turquoise Turntable or Jade JimJam for instance. Or Melting Macaron, working from the centre out and then joining with the outside of Turquoise Turntable – mmmmm – mouthwatering!

Victorian Snowdrop Garden

Lost Garden by Helen Shrimpton

I have been beavering away at a new blanket: Lost Garden, another gorgeous pattern from Helen Shrimpton. This one really is a joy and very relaxing to make.

The yarn is Stylecraft Special DK and the colours are, from the top: Lincoln, Cream, Stone and Parchment.

The hook is 4.5mm

Helen has taken her inspiration from the Lost Gardens of Heligana favourite place of mine, full of history, magic and delight.

This blanket will be a wedding present for the daughter of one of my closest friends. The colours are to go with her sitting room – a lap blanket to fold over a sofa and use for romantic snuggling in front of the TV. ❤ ❤

crochet snowdrop mandala

Not a palette I would have chosen, but I am finding it oh so calming to work with.

crochet blanket

The photo above shows the truest colours and was taken in Egypt. It was my early morning project before the rest of the house was up and doing.

The colours and their placement have got a lot of attention in the Helen’s Hookaholics Facebook Group. Some have said it looks Victorian, like a Meissen Plate and like Snowdrops. I love all these references – especially the snowdrops.

This is just before I start to square the corners.

A few people have asked me to give the colour order, so here goes:

Lost Garden by Helen ShrimptonRounds 1 – 10: Cream

Round 11: Parchment

Round 12: Lincoln

Round 13: Stone

Round 14: Parchment

Round 15: Stone

~

crochet snowdrop mandalaRounds 16 – 18: Parchment

Round 19: Lincoln

Round 20 and 21: Cream

Round 22: Lincoln

~

crochet blanket

Round 23: Lincoln

Round 24 – 26: Parchment

Round 27: Stone

Round 28: Cream

Round 29 – 32 : Parchment

~

Round 33 and 34: Parchment

Rounds 35 and 36: Stone

Round 37: Parchment

Round 38: Lincoln

Round 39: Parchment

Round 40: Lincoln

Round 41: Cream

Round 42: Lincoln

Round 43: Cream

Round 44 and 45: Parchment

~

 

Rounds 46 – 50: Parchment

 

 

and just in case you were wondering what it might look like in just two colours:

grey and white

It could look rather sophisticated in just grey and white don’t you think?

And for the next bit – the corners, see this post.

Free Pattern: Pixie Hat

free knitting pattern

This is for a newborn – 3 month old baby

The pattern has been tested by Tialys, pop across to see her beautifully stylish version made especially for her new great-nephew. Thank you Tialys!

Hat

Materials:

Stylecraft Special DK, Needles: Size 9 (3.75mm) and Size 8 (4mm)

Abbreviations:

yrn           yarn round needle

stst           stocking stitch

K2tog      knit two together

 

Starting at the rim of the hat, using Size 9 (3.75mm) needles and Lavender

Cast on 73sts

Next Row: K

Next Row: P1, (yrn, P2 tog) to the end.

Starting with a K row, work 6 rows of stst.

Change to no 8 needles and Cypress

Next Row: K

9 rows moss st.

Change to Meadow

Starting with a K row, work in stst

After two rows change to Pistachio

Continue in stst until work measures 9.5 cm (straighten out st st border to measure) ending with a P row.

Next Row: (K8, K2tog) to the last 3 sts, K3

Stst 3 rows

Next Row: (K7, K2tog) to last 3 sts, K3.

Stst 3 rows

Next Row: (K6, K2tog) to last 3 sts, K3.

Next row: P

Next Row: (K5, K2tog) to last 3 sts, K3.

Next Row: P

Next Row: (K4, K2tog) to last 3 sts, K3.

Next Row: P

Next Row: (K3, K2tog) to last 3 sts, K3.

Next Row: P

Next Row: (K2, K2tog) to last 3sts, K3.                                  24 sts

Next Row: P

Next row (K1, K2tog) to last 3 sts, K3

Next Row: P

Shape Point

Next row: K5, K2tog, K3, K2tog, K5

Next Row: P

Next row: K3, (K2tog, K2) x3

Next Row: P

Next row K1, (K2 tog, K2) x2,  K2tog, K1.         9sts

Next Row: P

Next row (K1, K2tog) x3

Next Row: P

Next row K2tog x 3

Next Row: P

Next row K3 tog

Break yarn and pull through leaving at least 30cm for sewing up.

 

To Make Up

  1. Sew from the point to the rim in mattress stitch, working on the reverse side for the stst of the curled rim.

Copyright: Sandra Dorey

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

I am happy for you to sell anything you make using my patterns. It would be great if you could credit me as the designer.

I’d love to see photos of what you make. You can tag them on Instagram.          #wilddaffodilpixie

Please respect my pattern, it is for your own use. Please do not pass it on to anyone else except by a link to this post – thank you.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~

If you try the pattern I’d love to know how you get on. Feedback most welcome.

Would you like a Pixie Point Jacket to go with it?

Sweet Pea baby jacket and hat, Flower FairyHere is a link to the free pattern: Flower Fairy Jacket with Pixie Points

 

1,568 Sawdust Hearts

Thanks to Cathy of Nanacathydotcom, I am taking part in a beautifully poignant Sawdust Heart project curated by Untangled Threads.

My Sawdust Heart is decorated in Memory of my Great Uncle, John Henry Absalom

who died, aged 17, on 10th July, 1916, in the Battle for Mametz Wood on the Somme in France. (photo courtesy of my second cousin HA)

His body was never found but his name is recorded on the Thiepval Memorial, northern France, which commemorates 72,246 soldiers missing in action.

I ordered some organic cotton printed with Welsh Dragonssawdust heart

I found this project surprisingly difficult to do. Each time I started thinking about what to do I felt shaky and anxious.

My Grandfather was 11 when his beloved brother John left for France, never to return. My Grandfather never got over it and would talk to me of John with tears in his eyes. He hated anything to do with War, as did my father, who fought in the RAF in WW2.

In November 2016 I had the huge honour of being present at a very special ceremony at a school in Nailsea honouring the fallen, including my Great Uncle John.

Being born on Armistice Day has always held great meaning for me, and as a child, I thought of my birthday as Peace Day. I donate to the Poppy Appeal, but I wear a white poppy. My father was proud to fight in ‘A War to End All Wars’ ….. or so he thought ….. sadly human conflict continues.peace poppy

My initial ideas for the heart were far too complicated which meant every time I made a start I hit a hurdle. I did a trial run and decided that would be ‘good enough’, or it would never be finishedsawdust heart

At last it was ready to send.

In the back I tucked a copy of the letter John wrote home to his family

sawdust heart

Letter:

 

France, 13th 1916

 

Dear Mother and All,

Received your most welcomed parcel safely everything was allright packed a treat.

You can imagine how glad I was to receive it, quite a change from our Army diet, hoping you will continue sending them the same, the battery fitted my flash lamp a treat. Received John Bull and Reynolds a few days ago. We have had glorious weather up to date with the exception of a few showers just what you can expect this month.

Our furlow have been cancelled for the time being, but I think we will get it shortly again as they tell me that they often cancel it out here and in a few weeks it starts again.

We are going back to the line again tonight but it is a very quiet place.

Now that the weather is coming we are much more comfortable wile in the trenches.

According to the papers the allies intending to advance all along the line. The sooner it comes the better. Well as we are barred from saying to much about our doings out here I will conclude hoping to find you all as it leaves me in the best of health.

Yours etc John

mind write by return JHA

~

Tomorrow I go with Cathy to the Armistice Commemoration gathering.