Tag Archives: sculpture

Dalby Forest 2: The Nissen Hut

Rachel Whiteread's Nissen Hut

Ever since seeing Cathy’s post about Rachel Whiteread’s, I was looking forward to seeing it. Cathy’s post sparked off a lively and forthright debate about what her readers thought of it and whether it is indeed ‘Art’, if you follow the link you can go to the comments and see what we all had to say about it.

I am a fan of Rachel Whiteread and her work, you can see other posts I’ve written about it, here, here , here and here.Nissen Hut by Rachel Whiteread

It’s not easy to sum up why I relate to her work, but I think it is about the way she gives the small, seemingly trivial aspects of human activity, construction and development a monumental quality. She uses real objects that show the marks of time and use and sets them in a monotone, permanent structure that gives us a chance to explore the details in a new way, and think about the hands that created the original structure and all that it connects to.broken windows

To me this is a war memorial that does not speak of the military, hierarchy or grand gestures, this commemorates Peter Nissen, the man who designed a pracitcal solution to a required need, during the First World War. Rachel WhitereadThe sculpture remembers the men who constructed it and lived in it and it connects us to those who constructed other Nissen huts over decades and all the different uses they have been put to. This one also commemorates the men who worked for the forestry and planted the forest it sits within. It commemorates time passing with the flaws and evidence of decay. It is the only permanent public piece in Britain of this, our most successful living female sculptor, it relates to all her other works throughout the world.mesh window

Making art is not only about making something that looks nice. Nissen SculptureIf it causes one to think about things in a different way it has done its job. broken windowsWithout knowing the story of this sculpture it would be difficult to appreciate what on earth it is doing in the forest.wooden planks, Rachel Whiteread

That is the same for most art – if we don’t want to discover more about it, we can just walk on by, but taking time to discover the story is, for me, an enriching, thought provoking and sometimes emotional experience.

corrugated, Rachel Whiteread

Here is a link to a short video about this sculpture

an article about the sculptor’s family connection,  her grandfather was a conscientious objector.

Not everyone will see it in the same way and all views are valid. Some of the locals were very much against it. I’d love to know what you think.

So that is the ‘deep and meaningful’ bit – now for a bit of silliness

In Cathy’s original post she wondered if the Nissen Hut would attract graffitti,  and Tialys’s comment prompted this quickly scrawled temporary bit of graffitti.

graffitti Nissen Hut

We was

graffitti -

and you can see a few more pics on this post of Cathy’s.

As we left it was getting dark and the sculpture took on a quiet ghostly glow through the trees

Rachel Whiteread

 

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Somerset House 2

LDB sculpture

In one corner of the courtyard there was Turkey’s contribution to the London Design Biennial exhibition, a cube made of white rods embedded with lights. You can read a description/explanation here. It is called ‘Home’, but I did not find any resonance with the title or the explanation. I did enjoy it though, it must have looked wonderful at night. IMG_1890The best bit was watching how others interacted with the space. There were some gorgeous romantic photographs being taken of girlfriends, couples and family groups, who all seemed to glow within this white space.

It got me thinking how wonderful it would be to have an exhibition of spaces/settings that would be perfect for photographic portraits. For instance, Rachel Whiteread’s sculptures would be perfect.

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Click on any photo to see it larger

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There was an exhibit ‘Kiss in Budapest’. The idea was that a person would enter from either end and kiss in the middle – outside the booth their picture would be displayed againt the backdrop of live webcam photos of places in Budapest. Fun idea.

Inside Somerset House room after room was filled with interactive exhibits.

This one from Qatar

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I could only get a faint floral whiff from a couple of the domes, maybe I needed to be taller, but I did like the shape of the carpet.

On to Germany’s exhibit of recycled household items recycled

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recycled bottle tops

I loved this standard lamp made of bottle tops, maybe I’ll try a table lamp one day.DSC_0742

Made from Beach Clean too – win-win!

Here are a couple of  links if you would like to read more about the Exhibition

Kiss in Budapest FB page.

‘Culture Trip’

Somerset House FB Page

Somerset House on Instagram

 

Monthly Meet Up: Sculpture

Hellooo!

Here we are again for our Monthly Photographic Meet-Up, happening each first Tuesday of the Month.

This month’s prompt is SCULPTURE.

Archive and/or current posts are all very welcome, just leave a link in the Comments to join in.

goat

First up a Pink Goat – I think this also qualifies for Cee’s Odd Ball Challenge don’t you, especially when teamed up with his friend Blue Hare

pink and blue

As seen during Dorset Arts Weeks at the Studio ofpen and ink

Jane Shaw in Cattistock. IMG_1455Do click on her name to go to her website and see more of her wonderful work.IMG_1456

During Arts Weeks we had the priviledge of seeing inside her studiostudio (1)

arranged for the two weeks as a gallery. What a charming space.

I’m looking forward to seeing your sculpture photos

More Sculpture can be seen in This Post, and the bizarre Doreen’s Garden post.

Now must dash

blue hare

as I’m off to do some gardening before the temperatures crank up – this afternoon I’m off to Sports Day at the school of 3 of my grandchildren – sunhats and of course camera at the ready.

The prompt for next month (August) is FLAKE

Silly Saturday

face in the pebbles

I met this guy on Branscombe Beach last weekend, any ideas what his name could be?

He looks like he might be emerging from his underground home to see who’s about.

Branscombe man

I think he might be related to this chap who lives in the Lost Gardens of Heligan

lost gardens of Heligan

I don’t know his name either.

Joining in with Cee’s Oddball Challenge

Up, Up and Away

themed bedroom

I had to nip away for an overnight stay in central London this week. I Googled ‘quirky, arty, hotels’ and up came the Pavillion Hotel on the Time Out site.

Just click on the link to see all the amazingly themed rooms, and crazy decor. Someone must have had such fun putting it all together. I would love to know the history of the person and the place, but couldn’t find anything. My bedroom was called ‘Up, Up and Away’.

themed bedroom decor, hot air balloon

Sadly I can’t recommend the ‘Hotel’, it has definitely seen better days. It is in a slightly dodgy area, there is a surly, bored person manning the desk, no resturant and this was my so called continental breakfast left outside my room in the morning.Yuck

 

 

 

Weetabix on the Go – euuuurrrrgghhhhhh! Who knew that even existed! Yuck!

 

But I did enjoy the decor and the quirky bits and peiceshot air balloon

The Hotel was quite close to Hyde Park, so before it got dark I had a brisk walk to Marble Arch where there is a strangely wild sculpture,

Danse Gwenedour

by British Sculptor Bushra Fakhoury

Danse Gwenedour by Bushra Fakhour

which was unveiled in March 2017.

There is always something arty to see in London, no matter how fleeting the visit. After a quick whizz round a bit of Hyde Park, which was looking rather bleak on a cold drizzly January afternoon, I found an oasis of a health food shop to pick up something for supper. Then back to my hotel as I did not want to be wandering those particualr streets after dark.

A nice cosy evening of knitting, reading and a bit of TV followed – always particularly relaxing away from home.

Tate Couple

Version 2

A wonderful BBC programme, Imagine,  was on TV on Saturday, giving insights about Rachel Whiteread’s 30 year career and the current Exhibition at Tate Britain.

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I became fascinated by this couple

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Their shapes, their colours, their interaction.

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People watching is one of my favourite things to do – you too?

Joining in with Norm’s Thursday Doors.

Doors, Rachel Whiteread

Rachel Whiteread

 

Rachel Whiteread at Tate Britain

fireplace, Rachel Whiteread

DSC_0349windows, Rachel Whiteread

Rounding off my weekend in London I went to Tate Britain to see the Rachel Whiteread exhibition. I have been interested in her work ever since ‘House’ in 1993.

Such an extraordinary thing to do.

Art that encourages us to see things differently is always exciting.

The atmosphere that was created by the exhibiton at the Tate was one of supreme calm and serenity. Something to do with the combination of neutral colours, scale and space. I would happily have spent the whole day there.

Rachel Whiteread

Making the domestic monumental.

I loved the way every shape interacted with the space and other objects in the space.

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Rachel Whiteread

Collections of used household objects cast as solid objects

looks simple doesn’t it but watch this film on ‘How to Cast like Rachel Whiteread’

and see just how many processes go into creating one object – mindblowing!

Rachel Whiteread

Book shelves reminding me of the first little library I used to visit with my Grandfather in the 1950s/60s

bookshelf, Rachel Whiteread

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There is something intriguing about exploring negative space.

Clever to keep the colours calm so that the mind can peacefully think about positive and negative without the noise of colour.

resin door

Rachel Whiteread door

And to get to know the artist better –  a film of Rachel Whitread talking about the way she works.