Category Archives: sculpture

Dalby Forest 2: The Nissen Hut

Rachel Whiteread's Nissen Hut

Ever since seeing Cathy’s post about Rachel Whiteread’s, I was looking forward to seeing it. Cathy’s post sparked off a lively and forthright debate about what her readers thought of it and whether it is indeed ‘Art’, if you follow the link you can go to the comments and see what we all had to say about it.

I am a fan of Rachel Whiteread and her work, you can see other posts I’ve written about it, here, here , here and here.Nissen Hut by Rachel Whiteread

It’s not easy to sum up why I relate to her work, but I think it is about the way she gives the small, seemingly trivial aspects of human activity, construction and development a monumental quality. She uses real objects that show the marks of time and use and sets them in a monotone, permanent structure that gives us a chance to explore the details in a new way, and think about the hands that created the original structure and all that it connects to.broken windows

To me this is a war memorial that does not speak of the military, hierarchy or grand gestures, this commemorates Peter Nissen, the man who designed a pracitcal solution to a required need, during the First World War. Rachel WhitereadThe sculpture remembers the men who constructed it and lived in it and it connects us to those who constructed other Nissen huts over decades and all the different uses they have been put to. This one also commemorates the men who worked for the forestry and planted the forest it sits within. It commemorates time passing with the flaws and evidence of decay. It is the only permanent public piece in Britain of this, our most successful living female sculptor, it relates to all her other works throughout the world.mesh window

Making art is not only about making something that looks nice. Nissen SculptureIf it causes one to think about things in a different way it has done its job. broken windowsWithout knowing the story of this sculpture it would be difficult to appreciate what on earth it is doing in the forest.wooden planks, Rachel Whiteread

That is the same for most art – if we don’t want to discover more about it, we can just walk on by, but taking time to discover the story is, for me, an enriching, thought provoking and sometimes emotional experience.

corrugated, Rachel Whiteread

Here is a link to a short video about this sculpture

an article about the sculptor’s family connection,  her grandfather was a conscientious objector.

Not everyone will see it in the same way and all views are valid. Some of the locals were very much against it. I’d love to know what you think.

So that is the ‘deep and meaningful’ bit – now for a bit of silliness

In Cathy’s original post she wondered if the Nissen Hut would attract graffitti,  and Tialys’s comment prompted this quickly scrawled temporary bit of graffitti.

graffitti Nissen Hut

We was

graffitti -

and you can see a few more pics on this post of Cathy’s.

As we left it was getting dark and the sculpture took on a quiet ghostly glow through the trees

Rachel Whiteread

 

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Somerset House 5: Time

I am still trying to understand why this exhibit had such a profound effect on me.

The Title is Time is Subjective and you can read more about it here.

time

70 hour glasses filled with sand

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all gleaming in a dark space underground

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UAE exhibit LDB 2018

there was something beautiful about the colour of the sand against the black and the sparkle of the glassesIMG_1899

and then they began to move

 

one row after the other

sands of time, LDB2018

The sands of time.

I felt so deeply connected to the idea and concept of rows of hour glasses, every so often turning slowly and another cycle would start, another event causing time to pass in a different way, at a different rate, with periods of stillness in between. The soft twinkle of the sand falling through and landing on the grains beneath …  and so many all together, all connected.

I am still not sure where that gets to me or why it does, but it does.

~~~

Thank you so much to all of you who have enjoyed this brief 5 part tour of the London Design Biennale. It has truly enriched my experience of the event to have you all along with me as I remember the experience.

I love going to exhibitons on my own so that I can experience them from my own perspective in silence; and then to be able to go round the exhibits again on a virtual tour with you, my blogging friends, is something very special, seeing things again with new eyes, the eyes of a collective creative group ………… so good!

Can you imagine us all going round together singly or in pairs and then meeting up and chatting about the exhibits whilst sitting in the sunshine in the piazza with a cappucino or a green tea and cake!

And then going back for another look all together ….

If you would like to go back in and wander around some more exhibits you can see them all here

Farewell London Design Biennale ……..  looking forward to the next one!

 

Somerset House 4

Now for a quick dash through some of the exhibits as my penultimate post about this fantasmagorical exhibition! Come on – keep up!

First up, Full Spectrum:  Australia’s Celebration of gay marriage being accepted by law

pride Oz

I liked the way the rainbow lights shone out of the darkness in such a playful way – metaphorically beautiful.

gay marriage celebration

Next a room to make you giddy with exotic scents and mesmerizing patterns

London Design Biennial 2018

from  Hong Kong, Sensorial Estates: lift the lids and inhale deeply! Heady stuff!

Hong Kong

And now a quick trip to Guatamala. This exhibit really deserves more time – click on the link to discover more and see much better photos. Such a great project.LDB 2018

colour

Closer to home: Dundee and Shpeel

interactive art

Each button on the black box, when pressed created a different light effect on the wall and different sounds. It was fun to play with these and feel like a conductor of light and sound. I played for some time here and  it got even better when I was joined by a group of students – I got a tiny teeny titchy sense of what it must be like to be Jean Michel Jarre! Ha!

 

Lastly, for this post, kaleidoscopic doodles from Saudi Arabia – blurred because they were constantly moving. Oh how I would love to be able to do this with my mandala doodles.

It makes me feel charged with electricity just thinking about it! A mandala doodle as a kaleidoscopic mirrored wall – oh my goodness wouldn’t that be trippy!

doodles

Gosh I have to stop now and go off into my mandala-doodle-filled fantasy – I might be lost all day!

Click on the links to discover more about each exhibit.

See you soon with my last post about the London Design Biennial at Somerset House.

Somerset House 2

LDB sculpture

In one corner of the courtyard there was Turkey’s contribution to the London Design Biennial exhibition, a cube made of white rods embedded with lights. You can read a description/explanation here. It is called ‘Home’, but I did not find any resonance with the title or the explanation. I did enjoy it though, it must have looked wonderful at night. IMG_1890The best bit was watching how others interacted with the space. There were some gorgeous romantic photographs being taken of girlfriends, couples and family groups, who all seemed to glow within this white space.

It got me thinking how wonderful it would be to have an exhibition of spaces/settings that would be perfect for photographic portraits. For instance, Rachel Whiteread’s sculptures would be perfect.

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Click on any photo to see it larger

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There was an exhibit ‘Kiss in Budapest’. The idea was that a person would enter from either end and kiss in the middle – outside the booth their picture would be displayed againt the backdrop of live webcam photos of places in Budapest. Fun idea.

Inside Somerset House room after room was filled with interactive exhibits.

This one from Qatar

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I could only get a faint floral whiff from a couple of the domes, maybe I needed to be taller, but I did like the shape of the carpet.

On to Germany’s exhibit of recycled household items recycled

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recycled bottle tops

I loved this standard lamp made of bottle tops, maybe I’ll try a table lamp one day.DSC_0742

Made from Beach Clean too – win-win!

Here are a couple of  links if you would like to read more about the Exhibition

Kiss in Budapest FB page.

‘Culture Trip’

Somerset House FB Page

Somerset House on Instagram

 

Somerset House 1

Last Friday I went to London to stay with Son number 2 and his family, but first a bit of art at Somerset House where they are holding the London Design Biennial

‘Emotional States’

40 countries participated

In the courtyard there were several pieces of interactive art/sculpture – my favourite type of art.

courtyard interactive sculpture

Greece provided a wobbly walkway that was entitled (click on the title to see the description)

ΑΝΥΠΑΚΟΗ

My own experience of it emphasized that every step we take has an impact.LDB sculpture

As you entered the sides expanded and opened up, with a creaky sound, each step made the next section open up for you, each step felt a bit wobbly

interactive art

so you had to think about keeping your balance. It was made of recycled plastic.

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A whole body experience has an impact on all the senses – every step I take makes a difference …  to something, or somebody.

If I know it in my body, I know it forever.

There was so much to see and interact with in the whole exhibition, and as you can imagine I took hundreds of photos. It is taking me a while to process the photos and the feelings that each exhibit evoked …… more to come.

Image

Silent Sunday

sculpture byt he lakes, Dorset

The perils of smoking with Petra Pear

fruit sculpture, health warning

Petra the pear was feeling poorly

She didn’t know quite what to do

Not only was she putting some weight on

But she was suffering from toothache too!

 

She had started to let her self go a bit

Indulging in too many treats

The sugary snacks made her teeth hurt

Causing trouble whenever she eats!

 

For too many years she’d been smoking

Which caused her teeth to go brown

Her gums receding and bleeding

It was time to turn things around.

 

She wanted her life to be fruitful

And continue her family tree

But she had to make sure she was healthy

And in the best shape she could be

 

First stop was to the doctors

To get help with giving up smoking

The harm it was causing her body

Was both sobering and thought-provoking

 

As if heart disease and strokes weren’t enough

It could cause breathing problems as well

Tooth loss, fertility problems and cancer

Not to mention the horrible smell

 

She decided to go for the patches

And started the very next day

She found that her nicotine cravings

Were slowly melting away.

 

Next stop was to the dentists

To see if something could brighten her smile

Because her teeth were so neglected

It was going to take a little while

 

It was not just about brushing and flossing

That Petra had neglected to do

But her sugary addiction

Had helped in her tooth decay too

 

The dentist took some impressions

And gave Petra’s mouth a good clean

She was advised not just to clean the outside

But all around, underneath and between.

 

It was too late for poor Pedra

To save some of the teeth that she had

She had to make some appointments

To remove the ones that were bad

 

Several months later and Pedra is glowing

Her smile now so fresh and so bright

She cleans her teeth like an expert

Even the ones she takes out at night!

 

humour, fruit sculpture, nicotine patch

Poem by Judy E. Martin

fruit sculpture and photos by Sandra Dorey

 

Here we are with another health related Silly Saturday. You might know that Judy, as well as being a hugely talented poet and writer, is also a nurse.

Following a great suggestion from Noelle last week to send Tom the Toothless Tomato to the Institute of Dentistry, we are thinking about coming up with more health related pictures and poems (not all about teeth!) accompanied by fruit, flower or shell assemblages – any ideas?

If you would like to read more of Judy’s work, a humorous twist on life, the world and everything go to her website, where you can also find a link to her book, Rhymes of the Times.

Have a fun Silly Saturday!