Category Archives: sculpture

Antony Gormley at the RA

Antony Gormley is one of my creative heroes. In the video at the end of this RA  link about the exhibtion and he says that ‘the viewer is the subject of the show’. Worth listening to.

Gormley

When I go to see an art exhibition I usually whizz round to get a sense of the whole, then I go back and spend time with the pieces I’m drawn to, graspthen I go round again and take photos of the pieces,Gormley

Gormley

Gormley at the RA

Gormelythen I go round again and notice how other people are interacting with the exhibits

Gormley

This is one of my favourite things to do

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RA

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Here is an excellent review by Studio International

I hope you enjoyed people watching with me.

At a few exhibitions recently I have started to take photos of people who go with the paintings they are viewing and then I came across this amazing post about Stefan Draschan’s work, take a look – fascinating.

An Arty Week

You might know that I am drawn to all things Japanese (here are some links to my posts about my trip to Japan in 2015) and have been most of my adult life. So when I saw a course at a highly respected art school entitled Abstract Painting and Wabi Sabi I just had to book a place.line, mark, charcoal, explore

You can Google ‘Wabi Sabi’ to find a definition and will get a few different results, I fear it might lose something in translation but in the context of abstract works of art this is my own best shot: the Japanese concept of Wabi Sabi, briefly/loosely translated as the celebration of materials and imperfection, leaving things unfinished for the viewer to complete it in their own experience of the piece. 

I learnt by doing, that it is also about immersing oneself in the materials, the properties of the materials and about how ones body and inner senses respond to the materials.

After booking this course, I heard about an exhibition in which a blogging friend, Alastair Duncan was exhibiting his interactive weaving, which I talked about in this post.

Alastair Duncan interactive weaving

AND THEN!

ANTONY GORMLEY at the Royal Academy – I just had to go and see that!Antony Gormley

To fit all this in I stayed in an Air BnB in Horsham in West Sussex, which had free parking and was just a 10 minute walk to the train station. In just over an hour I could be in Central London.

I drove the 3 hours to  Horsham last Saturday.

Visited the Espacio Gallery on Sunday – which I will tell you about in a future post. London gallery

There I met with 2 other members of the Stitchbook Collective – Oh SO lovely to make these creative connections!!

On Monday I travelled up to the Royal Academy for the Antony Gormley exhibition, Gormley at the RAwhich was absolutely amazing of course, but not quite so impactful as his exhibition in 2007 at the Hayward Gallery which I often think of and stays with me on some deep inner level.

And then on Tuesday I started my Wabi Sabi voyage of discovery with Helen Turner in Partridge Green, just a 20 minute drive each day from my cosy self-catering pad.

Wabi Sabi

I loved every minute! I got home yesterday.

So much to tell you about. So many photos to sift through!

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Silent Sunday

Sculpture by the Lakes

120, Fenchurch Street

Hellooo!selfie

Here we are again, this time on top of 120, Fenchurch Street – wow that sun was bright!

(see previous post about the Sky Garden at 20, Fenchurch St)

That is ‘The Gherkin’ in the background.

To get up to the roof garden at 120, you just turn up and queue. As people come out, more are let in – we only had a couple of people in front of us and didn’t have to wait at all. You go through an airport-style security scanner before getting into the lift.

roof garden

This garden is open to the sky with native planting and it is much quieter and calmer than in the tropical lushness of the other garden.

120, Fenchurch Street, London

I loved the play of light and shadows on the floor, walls and plants.

There are no restaurants there, but it is a perfect place to take a packed lunch as most of these people seemed to have done.120, Fenchurch St

They were perched on the edge of the rather awkward looking water feature, more comfortable seating would be a bonus.

From this terrace you can see ‘The Walkie-Talkie’ building and look at where we had been just a few minutes ago – in the garden on top of that building.

walkie talkie building

120 Fenchurch Strooff gdn

roof garden

so much to enjoy, looking in, looking up, looking through, looking out, roof gardenwith a few surreal reflections where the glass wall was high

London roof tops and reflections

and looking down building siteand DOWN!street

On the way out you pass under a vast ceiling covered with a moving video art installationsculpture in london

it is called Botanic and is a picture of slowly swirling flowers as if they are floating in a dark pool. It is part of Sculpture in the City.sculpture in the city

and as we walked back to the tube station we spotted some more, this one with a very long title that makes very little sense to me, and is something to do with lava and volcanoessculpture in the city

and thissculpture

Bridging Home

which could be very witty …….hmmm. Perhaps I need to find out a bit more about them to appreciate them more.

Edit: I looked for more images and information about this piece. I wanted to see the piece up closer and from the inside. I found this which says the Footbridge was closed so that the piece was not vandalised. Grrr! So eventually it will be removed. I seem to have a whole load of thoughts and emotions swirling around about that. It would have been good to have had a video to experience this replica of a displaced home. I get the reference to migrants and displacement and the fact that the ‘home’ looks as if it has been just dropped uncomfortably out of context, I just wish it’s message could have been presented in a more accessible way.

Searching for all of the 21 sculptures and getting up close to them could be a nice focus for another visit to London.

I will end with a photo my son took just before we left The City.

Look up!

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and went back to his house to spend a delightful weekend with him and his three girls, whilst their Mum was on a girly birthday celebration holiday.

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Silent Sunday

garden sculpture, Sculpture by the Lakes

Dalby Forest 2: The Nissen Hut

Rachel Whiteread's Nissen Hut

Ever since seeing Cathy’s post about Rachel Whiteread’s, I was looking forward to seeing it. Cathy’s post sparked off a lively and forthright debate about what her readers thought of it and whether it is indeed ‘Art’, if you follow the link you can go to the comments and see what we all had to say about it.

I am a fan of Rachel Whiteread and her work, you can see other posts I’ve written about it, here, here , here and here.Nissen Hut by Rachel Whiteread

It’s not easy to sum up why I relate to her work, but I think it is about the way she gives the small, seemingly trivial aspects of human activity, construction and development a monumental quality. She uses real objects that show the marks of time and use and sets them in a monotone, permanent structure that gives us a chance to explore the details in a new way, and think about the hands that created the original structure and all that it connects to.broken windows

To me this is a war memorial that does not speak of the military, hierarchy or grand gestures, this commemorates Peter Nissen, the man who designed a pracitcal solution to a required need, during the First World War. Rachel WhitereadThe sculpture remembers the men who constructed it and lived in it and it connects us to those who constructed other Nissen huts over decades and all the different uses they have been put to. This one also commemorates the men who worked for the forestry and planted the forest it sits within. It commemorates time passing with the flaws and evidence of decay. It is the only permanent public piece in Britain of this, our most successful living female sculptor, it relates to all her other works throughout the world.mesh window

Making art is not only about making something that looks nice. Nissen SculptureIf it causes one to think about things in a different way it has done its job. broken windowsWithout knowing the story of this sculpture it would be difficult to appreciate what on earth it is doing in the forest.wooden planks, Rachel Whiteread

That is the same for most art – if we don’t want to discover more about it, we can just walk on by, but taking time to discover the story is, for me, an enriching, thought provoking and sometimes emotional experience.

corrugated, Rachel Whiteread

Here is a link to a short video about this sculpture

an article about the sculptor’s family connection,  her grandfather was a conscientious objector.

Not everyone will see it in the same way and all views are valid. Some of the locals were very much against it. I’d love to know what you think.

So that is the ‘deep and meaningful’ bit – now for a bit of silliness

In Cathy’s original post she wondered if the Nissen Hut would attract graffitti,  and Tialys’s comment prompted this quickly scrawled temporary bit of graffitti.

graffitti Nissen Hut

We was

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and you can see a few more pics on this post of Cathy’s.

As we left it was getting dark and the sculpture took on a quiet ghostly glow through the trees

Rachel Whiteread

 

Somerset House 5: Time

I am still trying to understand why this exhibit had such a profound effect on me.

The Title is Time is Subjective and you can read more about it here.

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70 hour glasses filled with sand

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all gleaming in a dark space underground

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UAE exhibit LDB 2018

there was something beautiful about the colour of the sand against the black and the sparkle of the glassesIMG_1899

and then they began to move

 

one row after the other

sands of time, LDB2018

The sands of time.

I felt so deeply connected to the idea and concept of rows of hour glasses, every so often turning slowly and another cycle would start, another event causing time to pass in a different way, at a different rate, with periods of stillness in between. The soft twinkle of the sand falling through and landing on the grains beneath …  and so many all together, all connected.

I am still not sure where that gets to me or why it does, but it does.

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Thank you so much to all of you who have enjoyed this brief 5 part tour of the London Design Biennale. It has truly enriched my experience of the event to have you all along with me as I remember the experience.

I love going to exhibitons on my own so that I can experience them from my own perspective in silence; and then to be able to go round the exhibits again on a virtual tour with you, my blogging friends, is something very special, seeing things again with new eyes, the eyes of a collective creative group ………… so good!

Can you imagine us all going round together singly or in pairs and then meeting up and chatting about the exhibits whilst sitting in the sunshine in the piazza with a cappucino or a green tea and cake!

And then going back for another look all together ….

If you would like to go back in and wander around some more exhibits you can see them all here

Farewell London Design Biennale ……..  looking forward to the next one!